Posts Tagged "elder scrolls mmo news"

Too Old for D&D?

Posted by on Jul 7, 2015 in guides

Is there such thing as being ‘too old’ to play Dungeons & Dragons? This is the question I’ve been asking myself lately, and honestly I don’t see a specific age as a requirement. When I was growing up I played with a few of my friends, but I was never as involved as I wanted to be. Now that I’m older (and have my own place) it has become my goal to get a weekly group going. While I know that there are numerous tools that turn this tabletop game into a digital adventure, I miss being able to sit around an actual table and I miss the interactions and bonding that happens. I’ve seen a lot of my video game industry friends stating that they’re heading off to their weekly D&D night, and it makes me crave the entire experience even more. Silly? Maybe, but I love the creativity that comes from playing this game.

So I did it. I went out and bought the player’s handbook, the dungeon master’s guide, and the monster manual (plus two pounds of dice. I mean come on, you can never have enough dice). I downloaded an easy 5e adventure to whet my appetite, printed out character sheets, and asked a few friends if they wanted to come over to play. First session is creating characters. While I have played the game before (AGES ago) I’ve never been a DM. I’m excited about it. I love making up stories and describing locations. I love drawing maps. I am eager to see how players interact to certain things, and responding in kind. Since I’ve never DM’d before I figured the best way to go through the learning process would be to use an already created adventure, which is a lot shorter than a campaign. There are some more complex ones that you can purchase on Amazon, but I just did a quick internet search for a free one that used 5e rules. I don’t want things to be horribly complex, and I imagine that for my first few runs I’ll be quite lax on the “rules”. I’d rather players get creative and get into the story and involved rather than trying to enforce a lot of regulations.

Once I get more comfortable with how things flow, I’m looking forward to creating my own campaigns. I have a notebook ready for.. well, notes, and I’ve already begun planning out what stories I want to run, npc’s to fill my towns, and I’m looking forward to picking up some graph paper so I can hand-draw some maps. That’s right, I said hand draw. Who even does that these days. I know there are other bits and bobs that may be important to pick up along the way (like a play mat and miniatures) but for now those are not essential. Lets just see where this goes.

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Games with an Ending

Posted by on Jul 7, 2015 in guides

 

It’s an ongoing joke with anyone who knows me that I never finish the games I buy, especially not steam games. They can sit in my to-play list for years before I finally get around to them and even then, it’s rare that I ‘finish’ them. In truth I don’t own many games that have a solid ‘ending’ where I can sit down and feel confident that I’ve ‘beaten’ the game. Finishing a game is a pretty subjective point of view no matter how you look at it. Is a game completed when the story is completed? When you’ve earned all of the achievements? When you can’t progress a single character any further? What about games that have no real ending? Games like Sims 4, Banished, or Cities: Skylines? What constitutes the ‘end’ for you there? What about in an MMO, when have you ‘finished’ the game? When you’re at the maximum level available? When you’ve defeated all of the end-game encounters? There’s so many different values that you can attribute to the end of a game that it’s hard to know when one has completed it. At least for my games of choice which are typically sandbox games or at least games with sandbox features. Games like Super Mario World are much easier to decide when ‘the end’ is – but what about trying to accomplish all of the goals the game sets forth, for some people just making it to the end of a game isn’t actually ‘the end’.

So how do you decide when you’ve completed a game? How do you know when you’ve reached that point where there’s just nothing more for you to do and what do you do after that point, do you never return to the game even though it may have been one of your favourites? Or do games have unlimited re-play potential so long as you’re enjoying yourself?

Of course the whole reason this question came up is because I was glancing through my steam library trying to decide how many of my games (if any) I had ‘completed’ over the years. I’ve played through Magical Diary a handful of times now and seen multiple endings, so does that count as me having ‘completed’ the game? In the end, so long as I’m having fun, I suppose it doesn’t much matter – but it is fun to think about.

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